DT Strain

DT Strain

DT Strain is a Humanist minister, certified by the American Humanist Association. He writes and speaks on Spiritual Naturalism, with an emphasis on the overlap between ancient wisdom and modern naturalism. Much of his writing focuses on the intersection between Humanism, Buddhism, Stoicism, and other philosophies concerned with pursuit of the flourishing ‘good life’. DT Strain also writes a blog at www.HumanistContemplative.org and for the Houston Chronicle.

You know the secrets of the universe? Great. How does that help me love my neighbor?

Does faith in God differ from dogma & morality?

This week, Texas Faith asks: In a conversation last week with Eric Metaxas, author of Bonhoeffer: Martyr, Prophet, Spy and now Socrates in the City: Conversations on Life, God, and Other Small Topics, he brought up the distinction between faith in God and dogma and morality. As an example, he pointed to how dogma can [...]

Should Herman Cain’s accusers step forward?

Should Herman Cain’s accusers step forward?

The question here, as asked by Texas Faith is: As you know, Herman Cain faces allegations that he sexually harassed female employees during his time at the National Restaurant Association. The Republican fervently denies the charges, although there are reports that settlements have been made in these cases. Cain’s story about those settlements continues to [...]

Images of God and mental health

Images of God and mental health

Baylor’s Wave III religion survey, which came out in late September, takes a look at the connection between religion and mental health. Among the findings, the authors report that: “When it comes to religion, beliefs are more important than are behavior or affiliation…Frequency of prayer has no consistent effect on the number of reported mental [...]

Should the word “sin” be part of our political vocabulary?

Should the word “sin” be part of our political vocabulary?

People have different definitions of sin. But the real reason people use the word is because it sounds nastier than ‘immoral act’ or ‘unethical act’. As Wayne Slater notes, these terms carry with them a “secular sheen” which seems to imply one has merely broken ‘man’s law’ and not God’s law. This, perhaps, is why [...]